Video: this is how a Light-field camera works


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No matter what one makes of the Lytro cameras – the “shoot now, focus later” feature is no doubt interesting, but the cameras weren’t a success due to unusual bodies and control concepts, low resolution and steep prices – there is no denying that the concept behind light-field cameras, which made the jump into consumer territory with the Lytros, is a fascinating one.

However, not everyone has the time to read scientific dissertations on the topic, in order to grasp the functional principle behind these cameras. For such “dummies” – and I count myself among them – the YouTube channel Computerphile has created a 12-minutes long video. Therein Mike Pound, an image analyst at the University of Nottingham, explains in simple terms how a light-filed camera actually works.

This is by no means the only video on the said YouTube channel worth watching. I also found Secrets Hidden in Images (Steganography) very interesting. It’s hard to believe, that Shakespeare’s entire body of work can be hidden in a single JPEG file, without anyone being able to tell the difference with the naked eye between the manipulated and the authentic image file.

  1. The near focus range on this light field camera seems pretty decent (the keyboard shot).
    My first thought on this would be that a higher resolution one could create a revolution in the macro photography world, anybody who has tried out macro photography knows how frustrating the shallow depth of field can be; especially shooting handheld in “real time” situations (i.e. insects).

    I trust you will keep us updated on this interesting subject 🙂

    Reply

    1. The near focus range on this light field camera seems pretty decent (the keyboard shot).
      My first thought on this would be that a higher resolution one could create a revolution in the macro photography world, anybody who has tried out macro photography knows how frustrating the shallow depth of field can be; especially shooting handheld in “real time” situations (i.e. insects).

      Indeed, that would be great. Not having to stop down as much and use either slow shutter speeds or higher ISOs would be awesome.

      I trust you will keep us updated on this interesting subject 🙂

      I will! 🙂

      Reply

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